Editorial

Reducing direct causes of maternal death

Robert C Pattinson

Abstract


There are three conditions responsible for almost two-thirds of potentially avoidable maternal deaths in South Africa: non-pregnancy-related infections (most HIV-related), obstetric haemorrhage, and complications of hypertension in pregnancy. There has been a significant reduction in maternal deaths due to non-pregnancy related infections, but not in the other key conditions. The author looks at ways in which the number of maternal and perinatal deaths can be reduced further.

Author's affiliations

Robert C Pattinson, Editor

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Keywords

Maternal mortality; Emergency obstetric care; Emergency care signal functions; Direct maternal deaths

Cite this article

South African Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology 2013;19(3):59-60. DOI:10.7196/sajog.772

Article History

Date submitted: 2013-08-28
Date published: 2013-09-03

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