Research

The role of cervical length in predicting the success of induction of labour

A Amupala, T Cronje, S Adam

Abstract


Background. Induction of labour (IOL) is one of the most common procedures conducted in obstetric practice. Several scoring models are used to predict the probability of successful IOL, most notably the modified Bishop score. Cervical length measured by transvaginal ultrasound is gaining more attention as a potential measure of success of IOL.

Objective. To assess the role of transvaginal ultrasound measured cervical length (TVS-CL) in predicting the success of IOL.

Methods. A prospective observational study was conducted in the Pretoria Academic Complex. Patients admitted for IOL between 26- and 41-weeks’ gestation were included in the study regardless of indication. Eligible patients had a modified Bishop score and TVS-CL assessed prior to commencing IOL. IOL was conducted with either mechanical methods, medical methods or a combination thereof.

Results. We recruited 150 patients to the study. The modified Bishop score and TVS-CL were highly correlated (r=–0.74; p<0.0001). The receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve analysis and the area under the curve (AUC=0.671) highlighted the poor accuracy of TVS-CL in predicting the success of IOLr compared with the Bishop score. The mean of the TVS-CL was 29.20 mm, with sensitivity of 51% and specificity of 83%.

Conclusion. TVS-CL is a poor predictor of success of IOL compared with the modified Bishop score. The Bishop score remains valid in a resource-limited setting


Authors' affiliations

A Amupala, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Pretoria, South Africa

T Cronje, Department of Statistics, Faculty of Natural and Agricultural Sciences, University of Pretoria, South Africa

S Adam, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Pretoria, South Africa

Full Text

PDF (159KB)

Cite this article

South African Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology 2020;26(3):110-114. DOI:10.7196/sajog.1639

Article History

Date submitted: 2021-11-04
Date published: 2021-11-04

Article Views

Abstract views: 1876
Full text views: 1038

Comments on this article

*Read our policy for posting comments here


The South African Medical Association is the official publisher of the SAJOG.

                                                           

                                        SOUTH AFRICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION

                                                         Events | Careers | CPD

 

The South African Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology| Online ISSN: 2305-8862 | Print ISSN: 0038-2329 | 

Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial Works License (CC BY-NC 4.0) | 

This journal is protected by a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial Works License (CC BY-NC 4.0) | Read our privacy policy.

SAMA Journals: South African Medical Journal African Journal of Health Professions Education South African Journal of Bioethics and Law South African Journal of Child Health | Southern African Journal of Critical Care  | South African Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology | Undergraduate Research in Health African Journal of Thoracic and Critical Care Medicine  | Southern African Journal of Public Health